Anthony Shadid’s (1968-2012) House of Stone: A Memoir of Home, Family, and a Lost Middle East, is scheduled for release at the end of next month. The book, his third, will now also be a way of remembering Shadid.

According to The New Yorker, ““House of Stone” tells the story of Shadid’s efforts to rebuild—and excavate the history of—a family property in Lebanon.” It is Shadid’s third book-length work, but the first exploration of his personal family history.

Shadid recently told Mother Jones, when asked what sort of hometown reception he foresaw for the book:

I have no idea. I’m actually building a fence around the house right now because I’m worried the reception might not be all that great. I think people will understand what the town represents and what the town means, and be very proud of the book. I’ve tried to offer a memorial to what Marjayoun is and what it was and hopefully what it can still be. But, it’s a town, and a town is filled with gossip and rivalries and jealousies. I don’t think the reception is going to be universally the one I would’ve hoped for.

Peace to him and his family.

Excerpts of his two previous books:

From Shadid’s Night Draws Near

From Shadid’s Legacy of the Prophet

Shadid’s last story in the NYT:

Islamists’ Ideas on Democracy and Faith Face Test in Tunisia

4 thoughts on “Anthony Shadid’s Memoir, ‘House of Stone’

  1. I had an Arabic poetry class today in a classroom where Shadid taught Arabic as a teaching assistant. We had a moment of silence in his memory.

    Rest in peace.

  2. A very thoughtful post. Shadid’s dispatches from the Middle East set the bar for credible reporting anywhere. His books filled a massive gab in America’s knowledge of the area. But his empathy and humility show a rare human being who will be missed by many.

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